Art created
during
the pandemic

COVID-19 has left its mark on 2020 for numerous reasons: some unpleasant and others peculiar. Among the least distressing cases, there are ones related to productivity. In the workplace, for example, there has been an unquestionable slowdown, while in artistic productivity something never seen before has taken place: an excess.

The reason why writers, musicians, and artists of the past were great masters and generated a large number of artwork wasn't only because of their innate vocation, but because of the time they spent perfecting their artistic work. Nowadays, people are constantly influenced by other stimuli which doesn't allow them (or so they think...) to produce a large number of paintings, sculptures, books, etc. Confinement has taught us to manage our time, and to realize that if we discipline ourselves, we can generate a large amount of artwork and perfect our style.
 
However, during confinement, artists have been "forced" to create. In other words, inspiration hasn't come naturally but wrapped in a deep feeling, because inspiration is also influenced by stimuli. And that's where the key of this premise lies and the intent of these words: a reflection to provoke a new perspective on the artwork shown in this catalog, because it has been executed from a different point of view, from a different situation, from an agonizing environment and from frustration, denunciation and hope - and that gives much more value to artists and their work.
 
The artwork that we show in our catalogue hasn't been produced out of boredom, but through artistic discipline and the reunion with oneself: a place where there are no parties, beaches, swimming pools or shopping centers, but rather meditation, effort and solitude; an intimate reunion with the brush, canvas and other materials, without distractions.

Here you can find some of the artworks that featured in our catalogue with artworks created during the pandemic.

Untitled - imaginary adventure

Monika Lorincova, United Kingdom

This acrylic painting on paper was completed during the 2020 lockdown. It is inspired by travel, memories and the desire for freedom. The picture depicts abstract interpretation of a seaside pier with a roller coaster as a symbol of spontaneous adventure and entertainment.

Art to reborn/ arte para renace

Zandra Valenzuela, Chile

This piece was created in the early days of the pandemia in Chile. 

Detached

Marina Emphietzi, Greece

Although I am mostly known for my marine art, I was very inspired by the recent events of coronavirus and created my piece called 'Detached'. 'Detached' depicts an inner experience of self-transformation to become emotionally detached from other humans out of fear of illness and stress; a 'metaphora'* to a very different kind of creature in order to survive. (* Greek) Such metamorphosis makes a good metaphor for the great changes of globalisation, and what this pandemic is bringing about, a world transformation, leading to a whole new perception of existence. There may be a long period of confusion and disorientation on the inside, even if it is not showing on the outside. 'What takes a caterpillar a few weeks can often take a human a few years.' as described by renowned evolution biologist and futurist, Elisabet Sahtouris.

Presagios de esperanza

Julieth.art, Cuba

It is a kind of artistic catharsis, in such difficult times, where hope is the last thing lost. And as an artist I witness this reality, the dove par excellence symbol of this transcendent experience. The gaze turned towards the sky frames this search, often lost on the horizon.

Resiliencia

Osley Gil López, Cuba 

La obra de arte en sí es un producto resiliente a través del cual el autor se vale del trauma que ha creado la situación social actual para crear arte. Constituye una forma de enfrentar el conflicto en sí. Es ya el arte entendido como una forma de superación, razón propia de su concepción. En este caso la imagen nos deja ver al ser humano en medio de la crisis sanitaria per se, elementos que se han vuelto tan cotidianos como la propia mascarilla (uno de los que la delata), sin embargo no estamos en presencia de una imagen decadente. El uso de elementos funcionales connotativos que denotan esperanza, tranquilidad, supervivencia, en este caso el símbolo de la mariposa que recrean la unión hombre-naturaleza en un entramado perfecto de armonía a pesar de la situación desesperada. Es precisamente el develamiento de la belleza en esta obra de arte lo que transmite la capacidad de superación y fortaleza del ser humano. Resulta difícil encontrar esa tristeza humana impregnada por la crisis en esta obra de arte que refleja armonía y serenidad ante lo adverso.

Crisálida

Osley Gil López, Cuba 

La crisálida representa de forma literal el estado en el cual la larva de la mariposa se encuentra en un término medio hacia su etapa adulta, y suele estar durante esta fase encerrada en un capullo. Es así que a través de una especie de analogía con el entorno natural, la imagen intenta capturar la densidad del universo humano interior, la figuración del alma encerrada, contenida, pero en constante búsqueda del escape y el crecimiento.
La obra representa toda una metáfora social en relación a la situación actual del ser humano ante la contingencia, en donde su vida se reduce a un determinado espacio y se vale de su intento continuo de superación, supervivencia e impulso de desarrollo. Es ya el arte entendido como una forma de solución y progreso, razón propia de su concepción.

Untitled

Marcelo Maturana Luengo, Chile

La abstracción visual dirige el pensamiento a lugares impensados, sobre todo en tiempos de pandemia global.
Una etapa de crisis que genera un mundo nuevo.

Experiment

Jure Kralj, Slovenia

Visitors

Jure Kralj, Slovenia

Plague. Spring. Covid19

Anastasiya Khudoliy, Ukraine

2020 became a historical year, and on every person he left his mark. All of humanity will forever remember the permanent damage caused by the COVID 19 virus. We all pray that the time of isolation and quarantine is over and human lives are not lost.

Plague. Summer. Covid 19

Anastasiya Khudoliy, Ukraine

2020 became a historical year, and on every person he left his mark. All of humanity will forever remember the permanent damage caused by the COVID 19 virus. We all pray that the time of isolation and quarantine is over and human lives are not lost.

Plague. Autumn. Covid 19

Anastasiya Khudoliy, Ukraine

2020 became a historical year, and on every person he left his mark. All of humanity will forever remember the permanent damage caused by the COVID 19 virus. We all pray that the time of isolation and quarantine is over and human lives are not lost.

Plague. Winter. Covid 19

Anastasiya Khudoliy, Ukraine

2020 became a historical year, and on every person he left his mark. All of humanity will forever remember the permanent damage caused by the COVID 19 virus. We all pray that the time of isolation and quarantine is over and human lives are not lost.

Renaissance

Anastasiya Khudoliy, Ukraine

2020 was a difficult test for people all over the planet. Woe, fear, not fear of inevitability, loss of loved ones, work, stability — shocked everyone, diplomacy, left the feeling that everything would not be as before. But at all times there have been tragedies: pestilence and plague, epidemics. The world and people experienced them and resented with renewed vigor. Any crisis strikes new ideas, new opportunities, makes you think and do something different. Time to rebel and recover, not lose heart and create. Renaissance Time!

Cuba journey

Yovanis González, Cuba 


Cuba journey

Yovanis González, Cuba 


Lockdown patterns

James Moore, United Kingdom 

He always wanted to go abstract, but he was afraid to go ahead until lockdown. He tried it and become an abstract photographer.

Lockdown patterns

James Moore, United Kingdom 

He always wanted to go abstract, but he was afraid to go ahead until lockdown. He tried it and become an abstract photographer.

Stalker

Brut Carniollus, Slovenia

Safe Socializing In Time Of Quarantine
The word has stopped. Giving us an incredible opportunity to do the same and rethink the way we envision our society. An opportunity we never had or could even imagine. The world has stopped to give us time to think. Are we going to? Most probably not, but now we know the world can stop and we can too. We may refuse to accept the unthinkable, but while the world has stopped we also realized the pink elephant exists. And when all starts again we’ll know what we never before thought possible. The world can stop. And we can slow down too.

Safe socializing

Brut Carniollus, Slovenia

Safe Socializing In Time Of Quarantine
The word has stopped. Giving us an incredible opportunity to do the same and rethink the way we envision our society. An opportunity we never had or could even imagine. The world has stopped to give us time to think. Are we going to? Most probably not, but now we know the world can stop and we can too. We may refuse to accept the unthinkable, but while the world has stopped we also realized the pink elephant exists. And when all starts again we’ll know what we never before thought possible. The world can stop. And we can slow down too.

Watching me watching you

Brut Carniollus, Slovenia

Safe Socializing In Time Of Quarantine
The word has stopped. Giving us an incredible opportunity to do the same and rethink the way we envision our society. An opportunity we never had or could even imagine. The world has stopped to give us time to think. Are we going to? Most probably not, but now we know the world can stop and we can too. We may refuse to accept the unthinkable, but while the world has stopped we also realized the pink elephant exists. And when all starts again we’ll know what we never before thought possible. The world can stop. And we can slow down too.

Maikutlo aka a imetswe ( The feeling is overwhelming)

Ras Silas Motse, South Africa 

This is one of the pieces I’ve been working on since the lockdown began. I was inspired by an encounter I had when my younger brother and I were leaving a mall a few days before the lockdown began. I had been urging my brother to wear his gloves and mask when we leave the house, and to my dismay, I overhear the parking guard ask an elderly man whether he will be partaking in the wearing of masks and gloves in order to protect against Covid-19. The elderly man responded by saying “angiyintsiwa mina, ngiyindoda yangemphela (“I am not a small boy, I am a real man”), I won’t get this virus of yours”. This response took me by surprise so I pulled down my mask and said “this virus does not pick people according to age, gender or race, whatsoever”. He then became defensively aggressive and started walking towards me and that’s when I decided to get in my car and drive off. The whole encounter totally dismantled the progress I was making with encouraging my brother to protect himself because now he had the response of this elderly man to excuse himself from wearing a mask and gloves. The elderly man’s response was a clear example of toxic masculinity, as he was claiming immunity to this disease simply because he is ‘a man’. Funny enough, the recent works I had been working on were closely linked to the issues our country had been facing on gender based violence and toxic masculinity. So I decided to make use of the reference of an elderly woman’s profile. It spoke to me because her stillness and gaze expressed so many heavy emotions that one may find difficult to express verbally. For me, these emotions represent all the emotions we as a country are experiencing. So much uncertainty, grief, exhaustion, loneliness, boredom, etc. I added the bilboes (shackles) hanging from her neck to represent the heaviness of her emotions weighing her down. The vibrant colours represent the light at the end of these uncertain times. The end of Covid-19 that we can all be sure of and all look forward to, as long as we stay indoors to prevent the spread.